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Sleep

On October 1, 2013 at 3:13 PM Natasha S wrote

Hi Mark

I tend to agree with your article on digestion being lowest at night, and I’ve been abusing it by eating dinner sometimes at 1 am in the morning, or even after that time! Because I get caught up doing things on the computer, and I get home late at night too, between 8 pm and 9 pm. I want to change this, but am underweight at this point in my life – surely going for so many hours without food – will make me even thinner? Won’t my body start to cannibalize itself if I don’t eat for so long overnight? Besides, I get hungry pretty quickly after a light meal.

What about those who are night owls, and a bit underweight? This kind of eating might be good for those who carry a bit too much weight but so many hours without food might be detrimental for those who tend to be thin.

As I go to bed late – around midnight – I would be hungry again if I ate before 8.30 pm.

Would having a glass of goats milk kefir be all right if I was hungry before bed? I can’t sleep if I’m hungry.

Please help me with this question.

Thanks. Natasha.S

Mark’s Reply

Would you like the worlds most powerful drug for reducing stress, completely detoxing & rejuvenating your whole mind & body, preventing premature aging, and almost guaranteeing a long, healthy life. Well, the reality is, you already ‘naturally’, have access to something that does all that everyday…and it has no side effects & doesn’t cost a cent. It’s called ……..’Proper Sleep’.

And the best thing for Proper Sleep, is arguably the world’s oldest, most prescribed health advice of all time.

Do you have trouble getting to sleep, get to sleep but wake up during the night or think you sleep well yet don’t wake up refreshed?

We did a seminar with some night shift workers. As they have to sleep during the day, and thus miss their body’s natural sleep rejuvenation cycle, getting good-quality sleep is really important for them.

While there are many possible causes of not sleeping well, one that came up (and often overlooked), is how certain foods/drinks can adversely affect your sleep. So we thought we’d outline some of the main foods to avoid/reduce, for the 3 main types of disturbed sleep.

Here are ten tips for more settled, blissful sleep:

1. Eat three meals during the day – breakfast, lunch around noon and an early dinner.
2. Do regular balanced exercise – modern research also confirms that moderate exercise can help improve sleep.
3. Try to go to bed by 10 p.m., during the drowsy (Ayurvedic Kapha) time of night, so that your mind can settle down faster.
4. Eliminate or restrict severely the intake of stimulants such as caffeine or alcohol.
5. Wear comfortable clothing to bed — organic cotton is highly recommended .
6. Avoid hot, spicy foods at dinner.
7. Do not bring work-related material into the bedroom.
8. Keep your bedroom dark or very dimly lit.
9. A gentle massage of hands, feet and neck before bed can aid relaxation.
10. In bed, take long, deep, easy breaths, letting your mind and body relax.

Having trouble getting to sleep or would just like a more settled sleep?

From Western science, we know that an essential amino acid called ‘tryptophan‘, helps promote sleep. In Ayurvedic science, we know that ‘warm nourishing’ things, help settle the nervous system and therefore assist settled sleep. Put the two together and
we see why ‘warm milk’ (milk contains ‘tryptophan’) is a great age-old remedy* for sleep.

Metabolism is one of the popular buzzwords these days. Like to make sure your metabolism – basically the process of converting food into energy and using that energy (calories) to run your body – is at its peak? If you are having trouble shifting a few kilograms, feeling a little sluggish or just want to stay energised and feeling great, try these.